Cat Destroying Your Furniture? Never Again! - Cat Cave Co

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Cat Destroying Your Furniture? Never Again!

Cat parents are no strangers to ruined furniture. There are a lot of expenses that come with having a cat, but ruined furniture is certainly one of the biggest.

Maybe you’ve tried the ‘spray bottle’ trick, or even constantly shoo-ing your cats away from furniture.

If you’re like a lot of cat owners, you’ve also realized these can be a disappointment. They might work for some cats, but others are still just as inclined to trash your furniture regardless.

You need a solution to keep your cat from scratching your furniture.

What can you do to stop cats from scratching where they shouldn't? Stop worrying, and take action, because we have a master plan that can stop any cat from scratching furniture.

Step 1: Training Your Cat Not to Scratch Furniture

Training your cat not to scratch furniture is a process, but it’s far from impossible. We start our method with some of the things cats like, and some they definitely don’t.

Cats groom their paws frequently, when they’re trying to get rid of litter, shed fur, or any other mess. However, it’s also important to understand that cats do want, and need, to scratch.

Your main goal in this step is to discourage your cat from scratching furniture and doing a lot of damage.

To do this, you have to make certain areas of the furniture less appealing, and direct them to areas they can scratch.

First, you need some basic tools. These tools should work with your cat’s natural instincts if you want them to really be effective.

Tool #1: Double sided sticky tape

If you’ve never heard this technique before, we don’t blame you for questioning it. However, it’s important to consider your cat’s preferences and instincts.

Cats strongly dislike having dirty, sticky paws. In fact, just the sensation is enough to deter them from visiting or scratching certain areas.

Can you use regular tape? Sure. Is it a good idea? No. Regular tape isn’t meant for furniture, let alone holding up to your cat’s claws. What you need is something like our Scratch Guard.

You place it on any spot your cat tries to scratch your furniture. However, with this product, it’s just as much about protecting your furniture as it is training your cat.

Cats hate having sticky paws. When you place the Scratch Guard on your furniture, it also feels sticky when your cat tries to scratch it.

It instantly deters your cat, but also keeps them away from your furniture over time. Your cat won’t keep trying to scratch the same place when they feel it sticking to their paws.

Eventually, you can remove the Scratch Guard, and your cat won’t know the difference- because they won’t try to scratch that area anymore.

More about the Scratch Guard:
  • Flexible and durable for even tough spots on furniture
  • Works on nearly any material (even upholstery)
  • Reusable, includes everything needed for installation
  • Subtle and transparent, hardly noticeable on furniture
  • Resists damage from your cat's claws

Tool #2: Sisal Cat Furniture Scratcher

Some cats are just bound and determined to scratch at furniture. Or, maybe there’s a certain place they really gravitate toward. In these cases, it’s best to target the areas you allow them to scratch.

Every cat is different, and you need different tools to manage their scratching. We’ve found that the greatest success in these initial training stages comes from using two tools.

The first, as we mentioned, is the Scratch Guard, which works like the double sided tape method, but prevents damage from scratching furniture.

The next tool you need is the Sisal Pad Cat Scratcher Furniture Protector. It’s just as easy to use and install as the Scratch Pad. Even better, it works just as well to keep your cat from destroying your nice furniture.

It comes in plenty of different color combinations too, so you can find a fit for any furniture, and any decor style. It works a lot like scratching posts, but it keeps your sofa (or favorite chair) safe too.

More about the Sisal Pad:
  • Fast, easy installation
  • Lets cats scratch, but protects furniture
  • Attaches to furniture, even corners
  • Allows normal cat behavior, without the damage
  • Stop scratching and doing damage to other surfaces

Step 2: Provide Your Cats With Their Preferred Method of Scratching

The thing is, cats scratch by instinct. It’s almost like stretching when you wake up in the morning.

Cats scratch for a variety of reasons, but the important thing is to realize you can’t stop it (and you shouldn’t). Scratching a normal cat behavior, and it is good for both their physical and emotional health.

Rather than getting upset when they scratch your furniture, you need to give them another outlet to scratch on.

There’s no way to simply stop your cats from scratching. You have to provide them with a way to scratch, and one that they’ll prefer over destroying your furniture.

Using a Sisal Product

Sisal is one of the best materials to let your cat scratch on. If you really want to keep your furniture intact, look for cat scratching posts made with sisal.

Cats like the ropey texture as they scratch, and it helps them keep the cat's nails in shape.

Use a Cat Scratching Post

Scratching posts are a great way to keep cats from scratching where they shouldn't. One way to get cats interested in using a new scratching post is attaching a toy or other fun item to it.

We recommend using our 80cm Cat Scratching Post. This scratching post has a feather toy attached at the top to keep cats interested, and distracts the cat from scratching furniture.

It’s tall enough for cats of all sizes and ages, and sturdy enough for even the rowdiest cats.

We made this product to keep them happy, help keep their nails in shape, and to protect your home from damage.

If your cat scratches a certain piece of furniture in particular, protect that piece with a furniture guard, and place the scratching post nearby.

Your cat will naturally gravitate toward that area in your home, but if you use something like our Scratch Guard, your cat won’t want to scratch the furniture anymore (and you protect it at the same time).

However, you still need to provide your cat with an alternative. Putting the scratching post near their favorite spot draws them in, right where they’re already used to scratching furniture.

Once they use it regularly, you can begin moving the Sisal Scratching Post to a more convenient area.

Use a Scratching Tree or Condo

Some cats need more complex toys to keep them interested. One of the best ways to get cats’ attention is giving them plenty of variety.

For that reason, most cat owners find that cat trees and condos quickly become their cat’s favorite activity.

Cat trees have a variety of materials, textures, levels, and toys to keep cats occupied, with plenty of scratching posts throughout.

We designed our Cat Tree Scratching Condoto give cats everything they need to stay busy, and away from your furniture.

In fact, the ASPCA recommends a sturdy, tall, scratching area (or posts) with a variety of materials and different areas of interest.

Our Cat Tree Scratching Condo starts with the highest quality materials, and we ship right from the USA.

We create the base out of sturdy, top quality wood, and wrap it in the best cotton and sisal materials available.

Our scratching condos come with a variety of different styles, because we realize every cat is different, and has different needs.

Your cats can stop destroying your furniture, and start having fun exploring their new Scratching Condo.

This is a multipurpose solution that keeps your cats active and gives them a place to nap- but most importantly, it keeps them from ruining your furniture.

Why Do Cats Scratch?

Cats scratching is nothing new, but why do they do it? In nature, cats often scratch to mark their territory. Cats have scent glands that release when they do this, much like the scent glands on their head.

Their claws also create a visual marking that shows their territory. Even domesticated cats carry on this instinct. However, that’s not the only reason they do it.

Much of the reason cats scratch is to keep their claws in good shape. Scratching on abrasive material helps remove the old, outer layers of their claws (which is why we recommend, and manufacture sisal scratching posts).

It's also a good idea to help your feline, and make sure to trim your cat's nails regularly.

Other Reasons (Besides Claws)

Cats also scratch because it helps them stretch. It feels good to them and keeps all their muscles, joints, and tendons in good shape.

Unfortunately, your sofa is just the right height for all that destructive stretching (aka scratching).

Much like humans, cats tend to scratch more when waking up even when they nap during the day.

You can prevent some scratching by putting one of the scratching posts we recommend by their sleeping spots.

Some people think declawing cats is a solution to prevent the damage to their home.

However, most veterinary organizations strongly recommend declawing, and suggest owners find alternative measures (like our training method) to prevent this procedure.

How to Help Your Cat Use Their New Scratching Toys

Cats can take some time to get used to their new scratching substitutes. Of course, when you’re trying to preserve your furniture, time is the last thing you have.

We’ve discussed providing your cat with variety (like with our Scratching Tree Condo), and protecting your furniture with items like the Sisal Furniture Scratcher or Scratch Guard.

However, there are some things you can do to help them along.

  • Don’t Force it

It’s hard not to push the envelope when you want your cat to stop destroying your furniture. You should encourage your cat to use their new scratchers, but don’t force it.

It’s especially important that you don’t try to take your cat’s paws and make them scratch. It makes them uneasy, and can deter them from using their new scratcher at all.

  • Use Your Secret Weapon

Everyone knows cats go crazy for catnip. You don’t need to give them a bag of it, but you can use it to encourage them to start using their new scratcher.

Either sprinkle a small amount somewhere, if you’re using a scratching tree, or rub a bag of catnip on a sisal scratching post.

  • Get Multiple Options

Cats like variety, which is why a scratching tree or condo is a great tool to get them to stop scratching furniture.

However, it’s best to have different scratching surfaces, and place them throughout your house.

You have furniture in more than one room, so you need to give cats ‘legal’ alternatives to scratch throughout your home.

  • Be Patient

Your cat knows when you’re upset, and getting angry at them will only slow the process of training them not to scratch furniture.

Being impatient may ultimately prevent them from this otherwise natural behavior. Make sure you try placing their new 'toys' in different areas throughout your home. You may even need to try many places.

Just because they don't like the area, doesn't mean they don't enjoy the product you're using.

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